Posts Tagged ‘ Lord’s ’

It’s Not Just Cricket

By Alan Black for The Huffington Post

The English in their empire conquests to India and Pakistan brought the game of cricket in their armory, best understood as complicated. With the pavilion hosting tea, the sound of the leather ball on the willow bat soon spread across the verdant lands of the subcontinent. The locals embraced a game played by spectacularly white men with unimpeachable manners, in spectacularly white clothes.

Today, India and Pakistan are as mad for cricket as they are for being at each others nuclear throats. Cricket has helped keep the peace by allowing Indians and Pakistanis to throw cricket balls at each other. But while democratic India has become a stage for Western capital and its values, Pakistan sinks deeper into a sticky wicket of terrorism, biblical style floods and now something disabling and disastrous for the nation’s identity — the Pakistani national cricket team, the pride of the nation, have been caught red handed in a betting scandal that has knocked the tea cups off the saucers, spoiling the cucumber sandwiches.

Currently, Pakistan is playing England at the home of cricket in London, a sporting venue grandly named Lords. Over the last weekend, a national UK newspaper revealed a sting operation conducted by undercover journalists, who paid a man around $250,000 for information on when certain Pakistan players on the field were going to cheat. The operative, it is claimed, is linked to illegal gambling syndicates. Sure enough, the players cheated on cue and the sounds of the London bobbies running to catch the villains came shortly after. Now, the Pakistanis require something slightly stronger than tea — high powered lawyers will be a start, maybe a stolen plane to make their getaway.

For years, Pakistani cricket has been suspect. Investigators in the past were stumped and failed to prove what seemed obvious to any sentient viewer — Pakistan was cheating, throwing games to cash in on payments from gambling crime, the cricket version of baseball’s Black Socks. Pakistan has been on the back foot over the claims denying it as a conspiracy against them. But this scandal has bowled them out. The News of the World has all the evidence on videotape. It’s irrefutable — in flagrante delicto.

The London police and cricket’s governing authority are using much diplomatic nuance at this stage of the criminal investigation, Only recently, the British Prime Minister David Cameron insulted Pakistan while he was visiting their enemy, India. And now this! Cheats at Lords, the home of English cricket. This stain on the linen will provide more ammo for the prejudice merchants loading another flare to fire at poor old Pakistan — how can you trust them?

Should Pakistan be banned from international cricket, somewhat unlikely but possible if the poison goes all the way to the top of their game, the impact back home will be enormous. For millions of Pakistanis, cricket is more important than life or death. It is Pakistan’s rope to the world. A chance to show how great they are at a tremendously demanding and skillful sport. Add one more disaster to a nation seriously down on its luck.

Police Question Pakistan Cricket Team Over Newspaper’s Matchfixing Allegations

By Richard Sydenham for The Canadian Press

Police have questioned Pakistan’s cricket team over newspaper allegations of matchfixing during the current Test match against England at Lord’s, the team’s manager said on Saturday.

“I can confirm that we are aware of the allegations and Scotland Yard police are with us now at the hotel and we are helping with their inquiries,” team manager Yawar Saeed told The Associated Press. “This is as much as I can say at the moment.

” British newspaper the News of the World alleged in its Sunday edition that Pakistan players were secretly paid to deliberately bowl no-balls during the fourth and final Test against England as part of a betting scam.

The newspaper says it has secretly-filmed video footage of its undercover reporters, posing as front men for a Far East gambling cartel, in discussion with a man who appears to accept 150,000 pounds (C$244,000) in order to make sure no-balls are bowled at certain times during the match.

The News of the World says it has passed all its evidence to the police. Scotland Yard police said in a statement: “Following information received from the News of the World, we have today arrested a 35-year-old man on suspicion of conspiracy to defraud bookmakers.

” The International Cricket Council said it was aware of the situation and it, along with the England and Wales Cricket Board and the Pakistan Cricket Board, was “fully assisting” police with their inquiries.

“No players nor team officials have been arrested in relation to this incident and the fourth npower Test match will continue as scheduled on Sunday,” said the ICC’s statement. “As this is now subject to a police investigation neither ICC, ECB, PCB nor the ground authority, the MCC, will make any further comment.”

Any player found guilty of involvement in matchfixing faces a life ban from the sport. Pakistan needs to win the final Test against England at Lord’s to salvage a draw in the four-match series, but it faces an uphill task after scoring just 74 in reply to England’s first innings total of 446.

Pakistan Are Over Here But Thinking About Home

By Stephen Brenkley for The Independent

Pakistan are here to win. Anybody who thought that they were in England this summer to make up the numbers, licking their wounds, grateful to be given a temporary home, would be misguided. 

They may indeed be the refugees of world cricket, unable to play in their own country because teams refuse to go there, but they will be nobody’s fools. It is the most bizarre of tours they have embarked on. Starting on Tuesday at Lord’s, they play the first of two Tests against Australia, which will be considered as home matches.

 They then play four Tests against England in which they will be the touring side. Such have been the ramifications of the terrorist activities at home. Pakistan have been forced to play where they can. “It’s a big tour. It’s not easy to get hold of 17 boys, a lot on their first tour here, and I don’t think we have ever played six Test matches in two months,” said Yawar Saeed, their wise, veteran manager.

 “We have a young side here and it was important to keep them together. There is plenty of talent in this team. The one sitting there, Umar Akmal, is just a bundle of talent, God is so kind to him. I have told him, if he doesn’t use his talent I will beat him one of these days. I see him as a future Vivian Richards. Look at his confidence at his age and look at the way he’s playing. He’s a very good kid and I’m trying to help him and the left-arm fast bowler, [Mohammad] Aamer, who’s only 18 and can also do great things.”

There is, of course, no physical intent by Yawar towards the precocious Umar, he merely makes the point to reinforce his desire not to waste his gifts. There has been precious little sign of that so far.

Yawar is on his 26th or 27th tour – he really has lost count – as manager. At 75, he thought he had unpacked for the last time but with the shifting of officials yet again in the Pakistan Cricket Board he has returned as a safe pair of hands. He is an Anglophile who was educated at Millfield, played for Somerset for three seasons in the mid-Fifties and whose father, Mohammad Saeed, was the first captain of Pakistan post-partition and pre-Tests.

At the core of the thinking of those who run cricket in Pakistan is the day when they can play at home again. Somehow, cricket is being sustained despite the lack of international competition but Yawar and the PCB hierarchy know that cannot last while understanding the virtual boycott.

The memory is still raw of the Sri Lanka team being attacked on the way to a Test in Lahore last year. Yawar and the Pakistan team were in a coach 40 yards behind. “The whole thing is dependent on the conditions and security within the country,” he said. “You have to ask: Yawar, if you were an Australian or an Englishman, would you go there? It’s very difficult, I don’t blame any of the people who are hesitant to come there. But all I can say is it’s not as bad as it looks from here. I’m not saying it’s perfect.”

Pakistan have taken a big risk by appointing as captain Shahid Afridi, who has been in regular trouble for ill-discipline. He has not so far shown diplomatic tendencies when they may be needed. In England four years ago, Pakistan’s tour was almost derailed when the Fourth Test was abandoned amid allegations of ball-tampering.

On the tour of Australia last winter, disharmony led to a whitewash and a series of disciplinary actions later on. Shahid himself was penalised for being spotted biting a ball. “We had problems about the captain,” said Yawar. “I can see in Shahid the one who can get them all together, mould them into one team. People who matter have had a chat with Shahid. I am very confident he’s going to be OK. Even this ball-biting thing, it’s just that he’s so keen, he’s keen to win like a lot of people, so he does lose control at times. I don’t think he will as captain.”

So to Australia on Tuesday. “Playing Australia you have got to be mentally tough. That’s where I’m working on them. I have seen Australia play, I have seen these boys play, I know their psyche. I can’t say that overnight we will become X, Y, Z, but you will see a graph going up by the Test match.”

But nobody in Pakistan will rest until the next touring team arrives to play this attractive, gifted young team. “It has to be reintroduced. I can’t put a date on it but I think that something should happen within the next three or four years. I would love to see cricket being played in Pakistan again. Before I say goodbye to this world, I would love to see that.”

 

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